Addiction, Loss & Freedom: Lane Elvgen 6/7/56 - 5/17/13

I know I usually write about money topics because women’s financial fitness is such a passion of mine, but with my sister’s passing that seems to be all I can think about and be with.  

I write about Lane and grief for myself, but also for the millions of family members that are affected every day by addiction – the little losses of connection, stability, hope and the final loss when a loved one dies from their disease.

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Lane was always “weird” according to our mother – unique – so true. From the time she was born Lane set her own path and went her own way. She was incredibly bright, very loving, quite angry, depressed, manic (yes, bi-polar later diagnosed) a gifted, gifted artist who lived simply and adequately for many years in her little studio house with her garden of sunflowers and wildness, cats, and her beloved Gus, a queensland heeler.   

Lane’s passing is particularly poignant for me because the other professional hat I wear is addiction counselor – a hat I’ve worn for nearly 30 years. I’m blessed to be able to share what I know with my clients, but it’s different with family members, as some of you probably are aware. They don’t necessarily want or can allow our “help”.

She came to me in a meditation two days after she died and said this:  “I am finally free. What glory, what beauty, what insight. I’m so happy, I’m so happy, I’m so happy.”  I’m free right along with her though the grief is weighty at times and it’s ok. I know that to go into my heart and be with how it is and how I feel is a blessed part of the journey.  Feel free to communicate with me thru my gmail:  lynntelfordsahl@gmail.com and I write more about Lane in my blog: http://www.addictionmodesto.com/blog/

I know I usually write about money topics because women’s financial fitness is such a passion of mine, but with my sister’s passing that seems to be all I can think about and be with.  

I write about Lane and grief for myself, but also for the millions of family members that are affected every day by addiction – the little losses of connection, stability, hope and the final loss when a loved one dies from their disease.Lane was always “weird” according to our mother – unique – so true. From the time she was born Lane set her own path and went her own way. She was incredibly bright, very loving, quite angry, depressed, manic (yes, bi-polar later diagnosed) a gifted, gifted artist who lived simply and adequately for many years in her little studio house with her garden of sunflowers and wildness, cats, and her beloved Gus, a queensland heeler.    Lane’s passing is particularly poignant for me because the other professional hat I wear is addiction counselor – a hat I’ve worn for nearly 30 years. I’m blessed to be able to share what I know with my clients, but it’s different with family members, as some of you probably are aware. They don’t necessarily want or can allow our “help”.

She came to me in a meditation two days after she died and said this:  “I am finally free. What glory, what beauty, what insight. I’m so happy, I’m so happy, I’m so happy.”  I’m free right along with her though the grief is weighty at times and it’s ok. I know that to go into my heart and be with how it is and how I feel is a blessed part of the journey.  Feel free to communicate with me thru my gmail:  lynntelfordsahl@gmail.com and I write more about Lane in my blog: http://www.addictionmodesto.com/blog/